Albumin is a water-soluble protein produced in the liver that is the principal protein in blood plasma. If the kidneys are operating properly, then albumin is not found in the urine. These charts illustrate the albumin in a healthy kidney and unhealthy kidney:

albumin illustration

Albumin is important because of the role it plays in transporting many molecules in the blood and making sure that the blood does not leak into the tissues of the body. Albumin levels can indicate kidney, liver or protein absorption problems.

NORMAL RESULTS

The normal range is 3.4 – 5.4 grams per deciliter (one tenth of a liter).

LOWER THAN NORMAL RESULTS

Lower than normal levels of albumin may indicate:
Kidney diseases

Liver disease
Crohn’s disease (inflammation of the intestines)

Improper absorption of protein or too little protein in the diet

HIGHER THAN NORMAL RESULTS

Higher than normal levels of albumin may indicate:

Dehydration

Too much protein in the diet