In many Americans, the thyroid is not working properly. Sometimes the reason is directly related to the thyroid, but other times the thyroid problem is caused by a problem with the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists states the following:

•    27 million Americans have a hyperthyroid (overactive) or a hypothyroid (underactive) thyroid gland and more than half of these remain undiagnosed.
•    More than eight out of ten patients with thyroid disease are women.
•    Women are five to eight times more likely than men to suffer from hypothyroidism.
•    Fifteen to 20 percent of people with diabetes and their siblings or parents are likely to develop thyroid disease (compared to 4.5 percent of the general population).
•    Incidence of hypothyroidism increases with age.
•    By age 60, as many as 17 percent of women and 9 percent of men have hypothyroidism.

Endocrinologists are medical doctors who specialize in diagnosing and treating diseases that affect your endocrine system. The following listof symptoms is published by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. The three primary conditions associated with the operation of the thyroid gland are hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism or euthyroid (a normal thyroid). Here is a list of some of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism:

•    Heat intolerance
•    Sweating
•    Weight loss
•    Weight gain
•    Forgetfulness
•    Depression
•    Mental disturbances
•    Mood swings
•    Frequent bowel movements
•    Constipation
•    Changes in vision
•    Fatigue and muscle weakness
•    Menstrual disturbance
•    Impaired fertility
•    Sleep disturbances
•    Tremors
•    Dry, coarse hair
•    Hoarse voice